Podcast Episode 58: Talking to Your Employer About PD Series Part 2: Disability Inclusion and Accommodation at Work

Many people with Parkinson’s disease want to continue to work and contribute their skills in the workplace. Sometimes all it takes is recognition of their condition by their employer and accommodations to compensate for disabilities. In fact, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) provides certain protections in the workplace for people with disabilities once they reveal their situation to their employers, who are then required to make reasonable accommodations to do the job. In this second of two parts on talking to your employer about PD, Jim Sinocchi, Managing Director of the Global Office of Disability Inclusion at JPMorgan Chase & Company, a multinational investment bank and financial services company based in New York City, describes how the company recruits people with disabilities in their offices worldwide and assimilates them into the work environment. As the name of his office denotes, Chase considers inclusion an important aspect of facilitating the best job performance from everyone. From an employee’s perspective, Brian Baker, an executive recruiter and a former employee of JPMorgan Chase, describes his experience while there and gives his take on some workplace issues as a person with young onset Parkinson’s disease, including how to get job accommodations implemented in a timely manner.

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About This Episode

Released: July 2, 2019

Jim Sinocchi

Jim Sinocchi is Head of the global Office of Disability Inclusion at JPMorgan Chase.
He works closely with senior leaders across the firm to establish consistent standards and processes to better support employees with disabilities. The office also supports employees who care for disabled family members.

Sinocchi joined the firm in 2016 to head the newly established office.

Having sustained a spinal cord injury early in his business career, Sinocchi is keenly aware of the issues and challenges facing people with disabilities. He actively creates awareness and understanding of disability inclusion through his blog, View from the Chair. Sinocchi has served on the boards of Jawonio, an organization focused on the well-being and equality of people with disabilities, and the Human Rights Commission in Rockland County, N.Y. He currently serves as a board member of the Viscardi Center’s Board of Directors Inc., a K-12 school in New York for severely disabled students affiliated with The Viscardi School; United Spinal Association, a nonprofit that seeks to enhance the quality of life for people living with spinal cord injuries and disorders; and RespectAbility, a nonpartisan, nonprofit organization dedicated to fighting stigmas and advancing opportunities for individuals with disabilities.

Sinocchi joined the firm from IBM, where he led global workforce communications, creating awareness and understanding of IBM’s Human Resources and Diversity programs, policies and initiatives. He also served as the Corporate Communications Director for IBM’s Workforce Communications organization, ensuring their HR programs complemented their image as a technology leader and employer of choice. In addition, he was the lead co-chair executive for the IBMers with Disabilities Global Council.

Sinocchi received a Master’s degree in Public Administration from New York University and a Bachelor of Arts from Colgate University. He is married with two grown children and two grandchildren, and resides in the Boston area.

Brian Baker

 

Brian Baker grew up in a small town in central Ohio. After graduating high school he enlisted in the US Coast Guard where he spent 4 years before returning to Columbus, OH where he attended Mt. Vernon Nazarene graduating with a BA in Business. He is a single father of a 16 year old son Gabriel.  Brian was diagnosed with early onset Parkinson in December of 2015 at the age of 40.  Three years later he still continues to work full time as an Executive Recruiter and takes part in several PD related exercise programs 3-4 days a week.  He lives by the philosophy “I don’t have time to feel sorry for myself I have a life to live.”

 

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