Podcast Episode 54: Understanding Brain Imaging in Parkinson’s Disease

Standard practice in neurology uses imaging, such as magnetic resonance imaging, or MRI, of brain structures to make a diagnosis. But in Parkinson’s disease (PD), additional imaging technologies are needed since MRI is not particularly helpful to make the diagnosis. Recent studies have turned to brain imaging using new technological tools, looking for ways to better assess the disease, predict its progression, and evaluate potential drugs to treat it or slow its progression. Biomarkers  that can be seen in this type of brain imaging can be physical structures or biochemical signals, and researchers believe some correlate with the motor abilities of people with PD. Dr. Jon Stoessl of the University of British Columbia in Canada uses positron emission tomography, or PET scans, to research chemical biomarkers in the brain, such as dopamine, for these purposes.

Download This Episode

Related Resources

About This Episode

Released: May 7, 2019

Jon Stoessl

A. Jon Stoessl is Professor & Head of Neurology and Co-Director of the Djavad Mowafaghian Centre for Brain Health at UBC. He holds a Tier 1 Canada Research Chair in Parkinson’s, is Deputy Editor of Movement Disorders and sits on numerous other editorial boards including Lancet Neurology. He chairs the Scientific Advisory Board of the Parkinson’s Foundation and is President of the World Parkinson Coalition and a Member of the Order of Canada. Dr. Stoessl uses positron emission tomography to study Parkinson’s, including imaging biomarkers, the basis for complications of treatment and mechanisms of the placebo effect.

Want More?

Don't forget to subscribe! There are many ways to listen: iTunesGoogle PlayTuneIn (Amazon Echo), Spotify RSS Feed. (Need help subscribing? See our quick guide.)

For all of our Substantial Matters podcast episodes, visit parkinson.org/podcast.

For more insights on this topic, listen to our podcast episode “Understanding Biomarkers to Deliver Precise Treatments.” 

mail icon

Subscribe here to get the latest news on treatments, research and other updates.