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Erin Borger and Paul Blom Join NPF's Board of Directors

January 13, 2015

The National Parkinson Foundation Welcomes Two New Board Members

 

MIAMI,FL — The National Parkinson Foundation (NPF) announced the election of two new members to its Board of Directors: Erin R. Borger and Paul R. Blom. 

"We are pleased to add individuals with diverse backgrounds and geographies to NPF’s Board—our goal is to have NPF be truly representative of the Parkinson’s community," stated John W. Kozyak, Esq., NPF Chairman of the Board. "Erin and Paul’s combined experience will help move the mission of NPF forward to make life better for people with Parkinson’s and their families.”

Erin R. Borger was elected to the board in December 2014. Mr. Borger is in charge of Wealth Management in Northern California for UBS Financial Services. He serves as the Complex Director, overseeing $15 billion in assets in eight offices. He has served with UBS Financial since 2008, including his previous roles as Director, Branch Manager based in Florida and Management Training Advisor based in New York and New Jersey. Mr. Borger began his career with Morgan Stanley in 2003 as a Financial Advisor. Mr. Borger has long held an interest in neurological conditions and has supported various philanthropies personally and through his family foundation. He serves on the Board of Trustees: Visiting Committee and Neurology Committee for the University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine. He is also currently on the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Advisory Board and F.I.N. Sea Foundation's Board of Directors. 

Paul R. Blom was elected to the board in November 2014, as an ex officio member. Mr. Blom recently served as the president of the NPF Minnesota Board of Directors for the past ten years and is the current Chair of NPF’s Chapter Advisory Council, working to strengthen the NPF Chapter network. A strong advocate for the Parkinson’s community, he has served as a member of the Community Advisory Board for Struthers Parkinson’s Center, an NPF Center of Excellence. Mr. Blom and his husband, Bob White, are the owners of the Right at Home franchise in Bloomington, MN, and were instrumental in helping to secure the Right at Home franchise’s national sponsorship of Moving Day®, NPF’s signature fundraising walk.  Additionally, Mr. Blom serves as Vice-Chair of Training to Serve, a Minnesota non-profit that provides training for senior service providers regarding the unique needs and barriers of the aging LGBT community.  He also serves on the boards of Avenues for Homeless Youth and the Twin Cities Gay Men’s Chorus, and he is Treasurer of the Minneapolis Area Senior Workers Association.

Alan M. Slewett, who has been on the NPF board since 2001, became a member of the NPF Emeritus board as of January 2015. Mr. Slewett is the former President of Valentine Liquors, Inc., a Miami area chain of retail liquor and grocery stores.  He is the son of Nathan Slewett, the longtime, former President and Chairman Emeritus of the National Parkinson Foundation. 

“Alan Slewett has been a dedicated Board member and valued supporter in his own right,” stated John W. Kozyak, Esq. “We are honored to have his continued involvement as an Emeritus member of the Board.”

View a complete list of the NPF Board of Directors.



About the National Parkinson Foundation (NPF)
Founded in 1957, the National Parkinson Foundation's mission is to improve the quality of care for people with Parkinson's disease through research, education and outreach. NPF has funded more than $182 million in care, research and support services. For more information about NPF, visit www.parkinson.org, or call the NPF Helpline at 1-800-4PD-INFO (473-4636).

About Parkinson's Disease (PD)
Affecting an estimated one million Americans and four to six million worldwide, PD is the second most common neurodegenerative disease after Alzheimer's and is the 14th leading cause of death in the United States. It is associated with a progressive loss of motor control (e.g., shaking or tremor at rest and lack of facial expression) as well as non-motor symptoms (e.g., depression and anxiety). There is no cure for PD and 60,000 new cases are diagnosed each year in the United States alone.